'Inflammation and Antioxidants'

22 April 2017, Cavendish Conference Centre, London

Expert speakers

Course gluten-free lunch

Exhibitors

CPD hours

9.30 – 10.00
Registration

Enjoy teas, herbal teas, coffee, and seasonal cut fruit during registration.

10.00 – 11.00
Dr Thomas Levy, MD, JD

Our first speaker of the day, Dr Thomas Levy, will give his first presentation. Dr Levy’s title and synopsis will be available shortly.

About Dr Thomas Levy

Dr. Levy is a board-certified cardiologist and a bar-certified attorney. After practising adult cardiology for 15 years, he began to research the enormous toxicity associated with much dental work, as well as the pronounced ability of properly-administered vitamin C to neutralise this toxicity. He has now written ten books, with several addressing the wide-ranging properties of vitamin C in neutralising all toxins and resolving most infections, as well as its vital role in the effective treatment of heart disease and cancer. Others address the important roles of dental toxicity and nutrition in disease and health.

Currently, Dr. Levy continues to research the impact of the orthomolecular application of vitamin C and antioxidants in general on chronic degenerative diseases. His ongoing research involves documenting that all diseases are different forms and degrees of focal scurvy, arising from increased oxidative stress, especially intracellularly, and that they all benefit from protocols that optimise the antioxidant levels in the body. His work documents the importance of minimising toxin exposure while maximising antioxidant and nutrient/micronutrient intake and assimilation. He regularly gives lectures on this information at medical conferences around the world.

11.00 – 11.30
Refreshments

A short break for delegates to enjoy some refreshments and to network with peers and exhibitors.

11.30 – 12.30
Dr Thomas Levy

Dr Thomas Levy will give his final presentation, followed by a Q&A session. Full details will be revealed shortly.

About Dr Thomas Levy

Dr. Levy is a board-certified cardiologist and a bar-certified attorney. After practising adult cardiology for 15 years, he began to research the enormous toxicity associated with much dental work, as well as the pronounced ability of properly-administered vitamin C to neutralise this toxicity. He has now written ten books, with several addressing the wide-ranging properties of vitamin C in neutralising all toxins and resolving most infections, as well as its vital role in the effective treatment of heart disease and cancer. Others address the important roles of dental toxicity and nutrition in disease and health.

Currently, Dr. Levy continues to research the impact of the orthomolecular application of vitamin C and antioxidants in general on chronic degenerative diseases. His ongoing research involves documenting that all diseases are different forms and degrees of focal scurvy, arising from increased oxidative stress, especially intracellularly, and that they all benefit from protocols that optimise the antioxidant levels in the body. His work documents the importance of minimising toxin exposure while maximising antioxidant and nutrient/micronutrient intake and assimilation. He regularly gives lectures on this information at medical conferences around the world.

12.30 – 13.30
Lunch

Enjoy a three course gluten-free buffet lunch, with time to network with peers and exhibitors.

13.30 – 14.45
Professor Stig Bengmark, MD, PhD

Choosing Health – Honour your intestinal microflora, so that you may live long

The incidence of acute and chronic diseases is increasing worldwide and especially so in developing countries. This development is strongly associated with Western lifestyle: lack of physical exercise, mental stress, use of tobacco and alcohol but also with consumption of refined and calorie-condensed processed foods, and a lifestyle, which generally seem to increase the level of systemic inflammation in the body, “paralyse” the innate immune system and reduce resistance to disease. It is an interesting observation that most chronic diseases are related to each other, as they are all more or less a product of an obvious but often discrete elevation in systemic inflammation. Increasing evidence suggest that inflammation is “mother of disease”, which seems to explain old observations of clustering of disease to groups such as individuals and to families.Read more...

The science of molecular biology has provided tools to study how ingredients in foods influence the degree of systemic inflammation, affect the immune system and provide background for understanding development of disease. This recent new science, called nutrigenomics, provides effective tools to map various food ingredients and their effects on human genome and biology. It is increasingly evident that modern industrial processes both in agriculture and food industry, much associated with efforts to increase productivity, are to be held responsible for the unacceptably high content of unwanted pro-inflammatory molecules and carcinogenic molecules in our daily food.

Increasing evidence support the importance of consumption of fresh fruits and of especially vegetables, but also of non-cultivated fish, for protection against unhealthy. Plants are rich in anti-oxidative substances, biologically active fibres, proteins, plant fats, plant antioxidants and have all, especially at their exterior surfaces, a unique and strong protection layer rich in antioxidants, phospholipids and probiotic bacteria. Many thousand such substances also health-protecting bacteria exist in nature, most of them either unidentified or not fully explored, which have the potential to reduce the speed of ageing, prevent degenerative malfunction of organs in the body and protects against disease. Common for them are their unique ability to reduce systemic inflammation.  Some specific probiotic strains have also in clinical studies demonstrated unique ability to suppress inflammation and prevent from/cure disease. This recent knowledge provides great opportunities for individuals to influence her/his future health.

About Professor Bengmark

After a long successful career as a surgeon, professor and clinic director, Professor Stig Bengmark has become an acknowledged world authority on chronic inflammation and chronic diseases, which he says the facts show are a result of dysbiosis. Stig received his MD and PhD in medicine from Lund University in Sweden and has held the position of Honorary Visiting Professor at University College London since 1999.

He is a founding member of the editorial board of HepatoBiliary Surgery and Nutrition (HBSN), who describe him as “a living legend” and say he was “one of the three greatest European surgeons in recent history who were nicknamed the ‘three Bs’ (surnames start with B) – the Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms of hepatic surgery.” HBSN editor Prof Yilei Mao adds, “Stig has always had unlimited, unexpected, broad-spectrum, bright new ideas based on his unique observations that ordinary researchers would have ignored.”
Prof Bengmark’s list of academic publications is almost 1,000-strong. His long career at the top of the field of liver and gall bladder specialism has given him unique insights into chronic disease and inflammation. His investigations have led him to original publications on, for example, the effect of Lactobacillus pretreatment on the function of macrophages in acute liver injury, and to a review article on the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric (“Curcumin, an atoxic antioxidant and natural NFκB, Cyclooxygenase-2, Lipooxygenase, and inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase inhibitor: a shield against acute and chronic diseases”). He has addressed the inflammatory effect of endotoxins with “Integrative medicine and human health – the role of pre-, pro- and synbiotics” (Clinical and Translational Medicine, December 2012).
Stig is one of medicine’s best-kept secrets. The paper that brought him to our attention is an inspirational must-read, whether you can get one of the few remaining tickets to see him present in person or not. Free to access online, and an easy read, the paper is “Obesity, the deadly quartet and the contribution of the neglected daily organ rest – a new dimension of un-health and its prevention” (online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4526765). In it he deals with food habits – including insufficient “organ rest” between meals – as the real threat to the health of the Western world. He also warns that the early-warning signs of impeding disease are often ignored in orthodox treatment circles.
“The dysbiosis-induced low-grade inflammation and malfunctioning immune system induces early a series of various, seemingly benign, manifestations in the body, for which the sufferers often seek medical advice at their local general practitioner (GP, family doctor), and often receive symptomatic treatment. However, these minor, but irritating, symptoms should be taken seriously, as they are all signs of ongoing low grade inflammation, which with time might bring serious consequences – severe diseases and with time death.”
He also points up the huge differences between modern Western-style eating and a more Paleo regime, and breaks this down in terms of the liver and bile: long-chain fatty acids, significantly higher in a Western diet, enter the body through the thoracic duct – one of two “back door short-cuts” into the body and remain in circulation for hours before finally being metabolised by the liver.

14.45 – 15.15
Refreshments

A short break in the presentation for delegates to enjoy some refreshments.

15.15 – 16.30
Professor Stig Bengmark, MD, PhD

Choosing Health – Honour your intestinal microflora, so that you may live long

The incidence of acute and chronic diseases is increasing worldwide and especially so in developing countries. This development is strongly associated with Western lifestyle: lack of physical exercise, mental stress, use of tobacco and alcohol but also with consumption of refined and calorie-condensed processed foods, and a lifestyle, which generally seem to increase the level of systemic inflammation in the body, “paralyse” the innate immune system and reduce resistance to disease. It is an interesting observation that most chronic diseases are related to each other, as they are all more or less a product of an obvious but often discrete elevation in systemic inflammation. Increasing evidence suggest that inflammation is “mother of disease”, which seems to explain old observations of clustering of disease to groups such as individuals and to families.Read more...

The science of molecular biology has provided tools to study how ingredients in foods influence the degree of systemic inflammation, affect the immune system and provide background for understanding development of disease. This recent new science, called nutrigenomics, provides effective tools to map various food ingredients and their effects on human genome and biology. It is increasingly evident that modern industrial processes both in agriculture and food industry, much associated with efforts to increase productivity, are to be held responsible for the unacceptably high content of unwanted pro-inflammatory molecules and carcinogenic molecules in our daily food.

Increasing evidence support the importance of consumption of fresh fruits and of especially vegetables, but also of non-cultivated fish, for protection against unhealthy. Plants are rich in anti-oxidative substances, biologically active fibres, proteins, plant fats, plant antioxidants and have all, especially at their exterior surfaces, a unique and strong protection layer rich in antioxidants, phospholipids and probiotic bacteria. Many thousand such substances also health-protecting bacteria exist in nature, most of them either unidentified or not fully explored, which have the potential to reduce the speed of ageing, prevent degenerative malfunction of organs in the body and protects against disease. Common for them are their unique ability to reduce systemic inflammation.  Some specific probiotic strains have also in clinical studies demonstrated unique ability to suppress inflammation and prevent from/cure disease. This recent knowledge provides great opportunities for individuals to influence her/his future health.

About Professor Bengmark

After a long successful career as a surgeon, professor and clinic director, Professor Stig Bengmark has become an acknowledged world authority on chronic inflammation and chronic diseases, which he says the facts show are a result of dysbiosis. Stig received his MD and PhD in medicine from Lund University in Sweden and has held the position of Honorary Visiting Professor at University College London since 1999.

He is a founding member of the editorial board of HepatoBiliary Surgery and Nutrition (HBSN), who describe him as “a living legend” and say he was “one of the three greatest European surgeons in recent history who were nicknamed the ‘three Bs’ (surnames start with B) – the Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms of hepatic surgery.” HBSN editor Prof Yilei Mao adds, “Stig has always had unlimited, unexpected, broad-spectrum, bright new ideas based on his unique observations that ordinary researchers would have ignored.”
Prof Bengmark’s list of academic publications is almost 1,000-strong. His long career at the top of the field of liver and gall bladder specialism has given him unique insights into chronic disease and inflammation. His investigations have led him to original publications on, for example, the effect of Lactobacillus pretreatment on the function of macrophages in acute liver injury, and to a review article on the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric (“Curcumin, an atoxic antioxidant and natural NFκB, Cyclooxygenase-2, Lipooxygenase, and inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase inhibitor: a shield against acute and chronic diseases”). He has addressed the inflammatory effect of endotoxins with “Integrative medicine and human health – the role of pre-, pro- and synbiotics” (Clinical and Translational Medicine, December 2012).
Stig is one of medicine’s best-kept secrets. The paper that brought him to our attention is an inspirational must-read, whether you can get one of the few remaining tickets to see him present in person or not. Free to access online, and an easy read, the paper is “Obesity, the deadly quartet and the contribution of the neglected daily organ rest – a new dimension of un-health and its prevention” (online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4526765). In it he deals with food habits – including insufficient “organ rest” between meals – as the real threat to the health of the Western world. He also warns that the early-warning signs of impeding disease are often ignored in orthodox treatment circles.
“The dysbiosis-induced low-grade inflammation and malfunctioning immune system induces early a series of various, seemingly benign, manifestations in the body, for which the sufferers often seek medical advice at their local general practitioner (GP, family doctor), and often receive symptomatic treatment. However, these minor, but irritating, symptoms should be taken seriously, as they are all signs of ongoing low grade inflammation, which with time might bring serious consequences – severe diseases and with time death.”
He also points up the huge differences between modern Western-style eating and a more Paleo regime, and breaks this down in terms of the liver and bile: long-chain fatty acids, significantly higher in a Western diet, enter the body through the thoracic duct – one of two “back door short-cuts” into the body and remain in circulation for hours before finally being metabolised by the liver.

16.30
Day finish

‘Inflammation and Antioxidants’ will finish at 16.30

Guarantee your place

This CAM Conference in collaboration with BANT is expected to sell out quickly, so we recommend you book your place as soon as possible to avoid disappointment.

*Book now for only £95 (inc.VAT), with a multiple booking discount available for booking more than one event and additional discounts available for members of BANT, other associations and students*

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